CHAPMAN Julia Ann

Other than for Julia's health, Isaac was well equipped to travel. In the heat of the late spring, Julia gained some weight and felt pretty well. Deciding that they could safely make the trip, Isaac loaded the wagon, making a special bed for his wife. At first she did very well, cheerful that at last they could go west and be with their relatives. But as the trip continued, the strain began to tell. Some mornings she was unable to get up. When they crossed Loup's Fork they again pulled out of the line, getting one of the Elders who lived at the Fork, Isaac and he administered to her. She seemed to relax and feel better, but during the night she lapsed into her last long sleep.
After they buried her, Isaac was so grief stricken that he sat for days, staring in front of him, felled by his tragedy. One evening James Walsh came to his fire and said, "I have seen many tragedies along the trail, and I respect you for your grief, but life must go on. Now you owe your little ones an even greater responsibility than before. Now you must be both father and mother to them. Crying tears of anguish over your lost wife is right and proper, but you must never allow your grief to immobilize you. What would Julia want you to do? You have begun a great quest, which, unfortunately, she was too weak to finish. Now you must finish it for her."
Out in the night Isaac walked for hours, asking why? Why? But with the coming of midnight, a peace enveloped him like a cloud. His beliefs taught him that although her body was dead, she, herself was still alive and would wait for him. He must not fail her. The next morning, 10 July 1852, he gathered a bunch of wild flowers and placed

Children of Destiny

Emily Marie Crumpton-Deason presents on Clara Decker Young, Harriet Wheeler, and Ellen Sanders Kimball Emily works for the Church History Library for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints as the Pioneer Content Manager for the Church History Biographical Database. She graduated with a Master of Arts in History from Utah State University in […]

Speak Your Piece | Season 3, Ep. 12: Stories by Ken Sanders: SLC’s Book Trade, 1960s-70s Counterculture and Reciting Wendell Berry

Date: 09.13.2021 (Season 3, Episode 12, 77:00 min.) To read the complete Utah Dept. of Culture & Community Engagement show notes for this episode (including topics in time, photos and recommended readings) click here.  Interested in other episodes of Speak Your Piece? Click here for more episodes. Podcast Content: No scripts, no advanced questions, just a […]

Speak Your Piece | Sojourners to the Mormon West: Historian Michael Homer on Seeing Mormonism and Utah through European Eyes

Date: 08.02.2021 (Season 3, Episode 9, 01:03:32 min.) To read the complete Utah Dept. of Culture & Community Engagement show notes for this episode (including topics in time, photos and recommended readings) click here.  Interested in other episodes of Speak Your Piece? Click here for more episodes. Podcast Content: In this episode of Speak Your Piece, […]

Speak Your Piece | 12: Season 1, Ep. 12 (Part 1): Joe Hill (1879-1915): Labor Troubadour, Union Organizer & Execution in Utah

Date:  02.10.2020 (Season 1, Ep. 12; 36:41 minutes and 27:12 minutes (two audio segments). To read the complete Speak Your Piece shownotes for this episode click here.   Summary: Former Salt Lake Tribune Photo Editor Jeromy Harmon, breaks down Joe Hills’ crime (the murder of a grocer and his son on 773 South West Temple), […]

Speak Your Piece | 12: Season 1, Ep. 12 (Part 2): Joe Hill (1879-1915): Labor Troubadour, Union Organizer & Execution in Utah

Date:  02.10.2020 (Season 1, Ep. 12; 36:41 minutes and 27:12 minutes (two audio segments). To read the complete Speak Your Piece shownotes for this episode click here.   Summary: Former Salt Lake Tribune Photo Editor Jeromy Harmon, breaks down Joe Hills’ crime (the murder of a grocer and his son on 773 South West Temple), […]

Speak Your Piece | Season 1, Ep. 13 (Part 2): Rev. France Davis, 20th Century African Americans in Utah

Guest BioReverend France A. Davis, pastor emeritus, of the Salt Lake City’s Calvary Baptist Church, served his congregation as its pastor for over 45 years. In late December 2019 he stepped down. Still active in his congregation, still serving, he remains an influencer for his faith, and for Utah’s Civil Rights efforts, and for the […]

Speak Your Piece | Season 1, Ep. 13 (Part 1): Rev. France Davis, 20th Century African Americans in Utah

Guest BioReverend France A. Davis, pastor emeritus, of the Salt Lake City’s Calvary Baptist Church, served his congregation as its pastor for over 45 years. In late December 2019 he stepped down. Still active in his congregation, still serving, he remains an influencer for his faith, and for Utah’s Civil Rights efforts, and for the […]

Speak Your Piece | Season 2, Ep. 3 (Part 2 of 2) Leo Lyman’s Deep Dive into the “Sausage Making” of Utah’s Statehood

Podcast Content for Part 2 of 2: Concerning Utah’s statehood story, the oft heard quote comes to mind, attributed to German Chancellor Otto von Bismarck, who said: “laws and sausage, if they are to be enjoyed, should never be watched made.” Lyman’s well written book argues for the opposite: knowing the stories behind political actions […]

Speak Your Piece | 15: Season 2, Ep. 15: “My Life in [1950’s] Carbon County [Utah]:” A Conversation With Dr. Ronald G. Watt

3.15.2021 (Season 2: Episode 15; 76 minutes) Click here for the Utah Dept. of heritage & Arts Show Notes for this  Speak Your Piece episode. Introduction: In this episode of Speak Your Piece, historian Ron Watt describes his latest book, which is part memoir, part county history and part geography tour of 1950s Carbon County. […]

Speak Your Piece | 3: Season 3, Ep. 2: “Topaz Stories: Remembering the Japanese American Incarceration”

June 2, 2021 (Season 3, Episode 2,  48 minutes).  Click here to read the Utah Dept. of Culture & Community Engagement show notes for this Speak Your Piece episode. This episode of Speak Your Piece is based on a digital exhibit Topaz Stories: Remembering the Japanese American Incarceration, and includes selected readings of some deeply […]

JOHNSON, Benjamin Franklin

Every house was a hospital, but without nurses. There were hardly enough men to bury the dead. As Benjamin had cared for the sick at the Kirtland Poor Camp, he knew what should be done and was immediately called upon by Joseph to help. He reported: “I had come to Nauvoo on horseback and as the houses of the brethren were scattered for some distance up and down the river, I kept my horse under the saddle and rode from house to house giving medicines and caring for the sick, and for six weeks did not take off my boots or coat for one night of sleep.”

New Use for Old Mill

This article originally appeared in the May-June 1972 issue of pioneer Magazine The Old Washington Cotton factory at St. George has been purchased by Mr. and Mrs. Byron McLeese to be refurbished and used as a restaurant and social center with rooms for displays and artifacts. Mr. and Mrs. McLeese are residents of St. George. […]

ALLEMAN, John

JOHN ALLEMAN and his family arrived in Nauvoo in 1838 from Pennsylvania with two wagons, ten horses and their household possessions. He bought farm land and built a brick home for his family. He assisted in building the Nauvoo Temple and served as a cavalryman in the Nauvoo Legion.

FERRELL, Maggie Anna: A life history

At Pueblo they laid over for a day and a half to wait for another train to come through the mountains. The mountains were so steep that the only way to get the trains up over them was to put one engine on front and the other on back (one to push and one to pull) up the steep hills and then to hold them back as they went down the steep grades. Maggie was very frightened of the mountains and very homesick. When they were on the high ridges where Maggie could look down into the canyons she was very sure that they would fall down into them. The high mountains did not look very beautiful to the little fifteen year old from the low rolling hills of the Bluegrass country of Kentucky, and Tennessee and Illinois. She was very thankful when they reached Salt Lake City and the long trip was over.

X